A Simple Introduction to Electricity Production

Electricity is something we all take for granted. Like really take for granted and the process of producing electricity is complex, can involve heavy-duty equipment and takes an incredible amount of energy. The fact that it takes energy to produce energy is in itself weird and it takes tremendous amounts of heat to produce the dominant forms of electricity as power generators must reach high temperatures in order to turn coal, natural gas and nuclear waste into energy.

On the other side of the coin, solar and wind take none of the upfront energy investment to produce energy. Solar relies on photovoltaic panels that are able to capture the suns rays and turn the light energy in the suns rays into electricity. Wind power involves large wind turbines that operate on a simple principle (https://www.energy.gov/maps/how-does-wind-turbine-work). The energy in the wind turns two or three propeller-like blades around a rotor. The rotor is connected to the main shaft, which spins a generator to create electricity.Β On the other side of the coin, solar and wind take none of the upfront energy investment to produce energy. Wind power involves large wind turbines that operate on a simple principle. The energy in the wind turns two or three propeller-like blades around a rotor. The rotor is connected to the main shaft, which spins a generator to create electricity. On the other side of the coin, solar and wind take none of the upfront energy investment to produce energy.

Geothermal energy comes from that that is stored deeply in the earth or in hot springs. This heat is continuously produced by the decay of radioactive isotopes such as uranium, thorium, and potassium (https://globaledge.msu.edu/blog/post/55551/geothermal-and-hydroelectric-energy).Β Geothermal heat pump systemsΒ can heat and cool buildings and can also provide a source of hot water.Β Hydroelectric power Β is a form of energy generated by the motion of water and is converted into electricity. Hydroelectric energy is made from the constant motion of the water cycle and it is the result of solar heat and the gravitational forces from the earth. The water cycle starts with the evaporation of water and then it falls back down as rain, hail, or snow. This constant fall of water is what produces the hydroelectricity. Hydropower is fueled by water and driven by the sun, therefore; it is a sustainable fuel source (https://globaledge.msu.edu/blog/post/55551/geothermal-and-hydroelectric-energy).

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